New Report Suggests Growth for Metal Roofing is based on Climate Changes

Photo credit: Metal Roofing Alliance

According to the latest figures from the Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA), metal roofing is growing in popularity, especially in states that experience severe climate conditions. The report identifies the top five states for interest in metal roofing are Florida, Pennsylvania, California, New York and North Carolina, with Texas close behind.

MRA goes on to explain, “While these states represent major population hubs, they also have other factors in common: All have experienced increasingly severe weather and extreme climate conditions. From wildfires and hurricanes, to rooftop ice dams caused by polar vortex winter weather, all-season durability and performance have become top priority for homeowners in many states, especially for those looking to repair or rebuild after a climate-related disaster. Because quality metal roofing lasts 50-plus years, carries the highest Class A rating for fire protection and is strong enough to stand up to hurricane winds, hail and heavy snow, it is increasingly popular in regions where better protection against Mother Nature’s unpredictability is essential.”

Renee Ramey, executive director of the MRA, says, “Extreme weather and the need for more durable, resilient building materials is an issue that impacts nearly every region.” “That’s driving the need for residential metal roofing into brand new territories. Just as important is making sure there are local contractors ready to meet that demand, which is why the MRA is embarking on a full-court press to recruit more qualified metal roofing contractor members.”

Two recent examples of how metal roofing stood up to extreme weather events include the “Sand Palace,” in Mexico Beach, FL, and a 1,400 square-foot home, built in the 1940s, located in Panama City, FL — Both of which survived the fierce Hurricane Michael that barreled through the Florida Panhandle last fall.

Photo Credit: The New York Times

Among the ruins of Mexico Beach, FL, the only house that remained was the “Sand Palace.” As reported by the New York Times, the metal roof helped the home get through the hurricane almost unscathed. The house was built from poured concrete, reinforced by steel cables and rebar, with additional concrete bolstering the corners of the house. The space under the roof was minimized so that wind could not sneak in underneath and lift it off. The owners of the “Sand Palace” built the home to withstand 250 mile-an-hour winds.

Winner of the 2018 MRA Top Survivor Home challenge, the Panama City 1,400 square-foot home, built in the 1940s, survived ferocious conditions when Hurricane Michael struck as a Category 4-plus storm. With wind speeds of 155-mph, the hurricane wiped out nearly everything in its path, causing tall trees to snap and slice some homes clean in two. Not only did the metal roof on this home support the massive weight of a giant 60-foot pine tree that had toppled directly above, it sustained almost no damage. Fortified with a metal roof, MRA’s Top Survivor Home not only endured Michael’s impact with minor damage, but it also helped protect the family inside.

Photo credit: Metal Roofing Alliance

MRA is a long standing Partner Association of METALCON. Representing metal roofing manufacturers in the United States and Canada, the Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) was formed in 1998 as a nonprofit organization to help educate consumers about the many benefits of metal roofs. The main objective of MRA is to increase awareness of the beauty, durability and money-saving advantages of quality metal roofs among homeowners, as well as to provide support for metal roofing businesses and contractors. For more information, visit MRA.

METALCON 2019 will take place October 16-18 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Come learn from metal roofing experts and visit with exhibitors showcasing the latest industry products. Secure your hotel reservation today!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.